Posts Tagged 'Connectivity'

PowerPivot Technical Architecture Diagram Released: Security Architecture

Because PowerPivot for Excel and PowerPivot for SharePoint involves so many components from SQL Server 2008 R2 Analysis Services, Office 2010, and SharePoint 2010, this poster provides an end-to-end view of the PowerPivot Security Architecture in one view.  This view includes nearly all of the logical security surface areas and illustrates how these systems interact.

Included in this diagram are:

  • Service Accounts
  • SharePoint Databases
  • Security Hardening
  • Automatic Data Refresh
  • User Identity Flow
  • PowerPivot Permissions Levels

Please click through to continue reading: PowerPivot Technical Architecture Diagram

PowerPivot Technical Diagram: PowerPivot Security Architecture

Just in case you didn’t already know, we just uploaded the PowerPivot Security Architecture technical diagram on to sqlcat.com / MSDN.  To get access to the PDF, XPS, and/or VSD files, please click through to: http://sqlcat.com/whitepapers/archive/2010/08/17/powerpivot-technical-diagram-powerpivot-security-architecture.aspx

 PowerPivot Security Architecture

Enjoy!

[Note, this is cross posted from dennyglee.com in its entirety]

PowerPivot, you are so insensitive! (case that is)

June 18, 2010 by dennyglee

Working with my compatriots Ayad Shammout (@aashammout) and Peter Myers, we had found out that PowerPivot at times can be really insensitive…in terms of case that is.  That is by default, the collation for PowerPivot is case-insensitive.

For example, if you import the table below:

Continue reading: PowerPivot, you are so insensitive! (case that is)

PowerPivot and data feeds . . .

Great video by John Hancock on PowerPivot and data feeds

PowerPivot and data feeds . . ..

Howto: Get more flexibility when importing data from text files

By powerpivotgeek (dwickert@microsoft.com), on April 27th, 2010

Question: By default PowerPivot has two limitations when working with text files (using the Office ACE OLE DB provider): (1) will only import data from files with an extension of .txt, .tab, and .csv; and (2) it will only recognize tab, comma, semicolon, space, colon, and vertical bar and column delimiters. Is there a way to change PowerPivot’s configuration so that it will recognize other file extensions or column delimiters?

Read more…

Querying data within the PowerPivot Excel client add-in

By powerpivotgeek (dwickert@hotmail.com), on April 27th, 2010

Recently we have been seeing some users complain about how the PowerPivot Excel client add-in deals with queries. There are three limitations that you need deal with when working with SQL (TSQL, PL/SQL, or whatever) and stored procedures:

Continue reading Querying data within the PowerPivot Excel client add-in

Why PowerPivot requires ‘classic-mode’ web applications

By powerpivotgeek (dwickert@hotmail.com), on April 22nd, 2010

SharePoint 2010 has a new ‘claims-based’ authentication system that allows you to use federated identities with SharePoint. And there are certainly some customers that are excited to start playing around with this capability. That is neat and cool and all . . . but that isn’t the major reason why folks should be getting excited about ‘claims’. It is just a side-effect. The real reason why SharePoint uses claims is to bypass the Kerberos requirement within the farm. This is a huge benefit for SharePoint. In SharePoint 2007 once you grow beyond a single machine, then you must configure Kerberos between all of the servers – this quickly becomes a huge problem and limits both SharePoint adoption and its growth because many customers do not have the infrastructure needed to run Kerberos. But before you get too carried away with claims, particularly with PowerPivot, you have to remember two things: (a) PowerPivot only support Windows users and (b) we don’t support claims integration down to the client. The first one is easy to understand as SSAS only supports Windows credentials – and Excel Services uses that to establish the Windows identity for the connection. Having claims down to the client means that the user can perform one login to SharePoint – and have it be remembered for all future logins.

Continue reading: Why PowerPivot requires ‘classic-mode’ web applications


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