Archive for the 'Calculation' Category

When is null not a null?

By powerpivotgeek (dwickert@microsoft.com), on February 15th, 2010

Recently there have been some discussions on the forums and in other areas concerning how PowerPivot handles nulls. As this has changed between CTP3 (back in November) and the upcoming RTM of the product, I thought that it would be a good posting. Here is the situation: suppose you have a simple calculated measure:

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Create a #PowerPivot report filtered by the Top X Users by (Part 3 of 3)

This blog posting is a continuation of previous post, Create a #PowerPivot report filtered by the Top X Users by (Part 1 of 3), where I had created an Excel Named Set based on the Top 10 Users by Events as noted in Figure 1.  What is handy about using named sets is that it will only render the top 10 rows as opposed to the millions of rows of users this data set has.  While it is easy to show the Top 10 users, it is not straightforward to filter by those Top 10 users because Excel Named Sets cannot be used as a filter.  Example reports with  this type of business logic include “most common hospital departmental systems that the top 10 users are accessing” or “what are the most watched TV programs of the top 10 markets (i.e. cities)”.

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Figure 1: Top 10 Users by Events using an Excel  Named Set

In the second blog posting of this series, Create a #PowerPivot report filtered by the Top X Users by (Part 2 of 3), I showed how to filter by this same named set in a static fashion.    In this third part of this blog series, let’s figure out how to filter by a named set in a dynamic fashion.

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Create a #PowerPivot report filtered by the Top X Users by (Part 2 of 3)

This blog posting is a continuation of previous post, Create a #PowerPivot report filtered by the Top X Users by (Part 1 of 3), where I had created an Excel Named Set based on the Top 10 Users by Events as noted in Figure 1.  What is handy about using named sets is that it will only render the top 10 rows as opposed to the millions of rows of users this data set has.

image

Figure 1: Top 10 Users by Events using an Excel  Named Set

 While it is easy to show the Top 10 users, it is not straightforward to filter by those Top 10 users because Excel Named Sets cannot be used as a filter.  Example reports with  this type of business logic include “most common hospital departmental systems that the top 10 users are accessing” or “what are the most watched TV programs of the top 10 markets (i.e. cities)”.

Read more…

Create a #PowerPivot report filtered by the Top X Users by (Part 1 of 3)

January 27, 2010 by dennyglee
I was recently working with a customer to help them solve an interesting PowerPivot problem where they had wanted to get the Top 10 users within their data set and create reports based on that.  One approach is to create a rank function within PowerPivot as noted in a Rank function thread on the SQL Server 2008 R2 PowerPivot for Excel forum?  Another way is to create a Pivot Table where the UserID was placed in the [rows] and the measure in question in the [data] area; and sort the data from largest to smallest.